Are there some cases that should not go through mediation?

The short answer is yes, there are some cases that are not well-suited for mediation. However, it is important not to jump to conclusions about where mediation is more flexible and adept that many people give it credit for.


There are three main classes of cases that are unsuitable for mediation: (1.) Extremely contentious cases in which a history of abuse or imbalanced power dynamics prevents one spouse from effectively advocating for him or herself, even with the aid of a mediator. (2.) Complex financial cases in which one spouse lacks the training, knowledge or acumen to evaluate the financial issues in the case, and (3.) cases in which one or both spouses fail to show a good-faith commitment to the mediation process by providing accurate information or records, or by failing to negotiate honestly.


If you are worried that your divorce will be too complex for mediation, bear in mind that outside experts like accountants, real estate appraisers, and even investigators can be brought into a divorce mediation to help, just as such outside experts can play a role in divorce litigation. These professionals can provide the special knowledge it takes to adequately resolve your divorce in mediation. Moreover, many spouses address complex financial issues in a mediation by hiring a mediation-friendly attorney as a Mediation Coach. Such attorneys are trained to analyze complex financial issues in a divorce and can provide invaluable aid to spouses who are trying to understand a family’s finances.


If you are worried that you and your spouse are too adversarial for mediation to work, you might have more cause for concern. Divorce mediation is based on mutual respect, trust, and communication. If you do not think that your spouse will play fair or if you do not trust your spouse, then mediation might not be your best option. The same goes for if your spouse has been abusive in the past and you are concerned for your safety. If you are worried that your spouse has special knowledge or too much of the bargaining power in your relationship for mediation to work, though, it is important to remember that some of these issues can be addressed through the use of a Mediation Coach, and that mediators are trained to see these problems and account for them in ways that does not let one spouse overpower the other.

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