• Alan Jacobs

Co-Parenting and COVID-19: Choosing not to Go to War With Your Ex

Updated: May 11, 2020

When it comes to co-parenting, settling into a consistent routine is usually in every family member's best interest. However, because of the novel Coronavirus, many co-parenting schedules are getting turned on their heads.


In this excellent blog posting, Jenny Amanna shares a very personal account of her decision not to fight her husband's insistence that their two sons remain with him, at his house, and she not be allowed to visit during the COVID-19 outbreak.


As Jenny writes, "Divorce sucks and co-parenting is hard. Co-parenting after a brutal divorce is even harder. And co-parenting after a brutal divorce and through the middle of a worldwide pandemic is enough to make even the best parents go insane. I want to keep laughing, keep loving, keep learning and keep growing - and above all else, I just want to keep going - life’s different right now, it’s stressful and scary and overwhelming, and the winds are shifting and instead of fighting, I am choosing to adjust the sails."


The effective lock-down of the courts in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic does not need to deter couples who have been planning to resolve their divorce through divorce mediation. I offer teleconference and on-line video mediation to quickly and effectively start or continue the divorce process and resolve urgent financial and child-related issues resulting from the coronavirus crisis while the courts are closed.


For more information or to schedule a free, no-obligation, private, confidential consultation visit FalmouthMediation.com or call 508-566-4159.

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